You are currently viewing S4:5 Do I have a story to tell? with Jilliane Yawney

In this episode, I speak with Story Coach and storyteller, Jilliane Yawney. Jilliane shares her story about how a road trip with a stop in Detroit Michigan changed the trajectory of her life and instilled in her a love for storytelling. 

Jilliane explains what it takes to be an excellent storyteller—but possibly more importantly— she provided insight on why we need to tell our stories. Finally, for those of you wondering, Do I even have a story to tell? Yes, you do. 

Listen to find out more about the power of your own story. 

About Jilliane Yawney

Jilliane Yawney has helped over 1,000 people get on stage to share their story. She is a Story Coach and the creator of the Core 7 Stories for Business™ framework. Jilliane has worked with the likes of Shark Tank winners, board game creators, and multinational real estate managers to change lives and grow brands.

Jilliane’s undergrad and graduate degrees both focused on storytelling, and her thesis work explored the motivational power of story. She has been working as a storyteller and Story Coach for 20 years and is committed to helping individuals and teams grow their confidence and communication skills with story.

Jillian believes self-expression supports happiness and human connection. She believes learning and growth is best achieved through a positive, supportive approach. She strives to foster and create beauty in all that she does – and that means helping you tell your story. 

Connect with Jilliane Yawney

Web: https://www.jillianeyawney.com

IG: @jillianeyawney

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